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Pic's Cashew Butter

Cashews roasted and cautiously crushed in Nelson, NZ

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The cashew is a peculiar nut. It grows wild in steamy tropical jungles, dangling from the bottom of a fruit, encased in a nasty toxic shell that is used for making drain cleaners and the like.

It roasts and squashes relatively easily and produces a softly textured butter with a slightly sweet flavour.

We don’t add anything to our cashew butter and we recommend you keep it on the top shelf away from the kids. It’s more than just moreish and just a teaspoon of it squashes that voice in your head that demands sweet satisfaction.

Ways to Use Pic’s Really Good Almond and Cashew Butters

Just like our Really Good Peanut Butter, our new nut butters prove just as versatile in the pantry and offer big flavour from just a tiny teaspoon. Here’s some ideas from the Pic’s Team.

  • Breakfast and brunch dishes. For super-decadent French toast, make almond butter and squished fresh boysenberry sandwiches then dip them in a mixture of egg and milk before cooking in a hot pan.
    Use it to thicken and flavour smoothies. Our favourite is coconut water, chunks of fresh pineapple, ice and cashew butter – a very wholesome pina colada.
    Dollop on oats, drizzle on pancakes and of course, smear on toast.
    Use it to bind hearty, healthy granola bars. Use the almond butter and blend with dried fruit, oats and seeds.
  • Lunch and dinner dishes. Pic’s has commissioned some beautiful recipes from Shared Kitchen's Julie Biuso using Pic’s new almond and cashew butters.
    Julie has created three stylish dishes, which are perfect for new ideas for entertaining - a chicken in almond butter sauce, a spicy fish soup with coconut and cashew butter and roasted cauliflower with chilli cashew butter sauce. Click here to try.
  • Dips. To switch up your basic hummus, blend almond butter into the dip in place of tahini. Cashew works in place of cream cheese as a dairy free option.
  • Dressings and sauces. Whisk almond butter into a basic vinaigrette to dress sturdy vegetables like carrots, kale and cabbage.
    Make a nutty pesto by adding almond butter to chopped herbs, garlic and grated cheese, without bringing out your food processor.
    Or blend either butter with the following: dried chillies, garlic, vinegar and pumpkin seeds for a fast version of pipián, a Mexican sauce.
  • Soups. Stir it into pureed soups for extra protein; the almond flavour is especially nice with orange vegetables, like butternut squash, carrots and sweet potatoes. Cashew butter is an ideal replacement for cream or coconut milk in a stew, curry or stir fry – just add a tablespoon to a sauce to thicken.
  • Desserts. Add a grown-up nutty flavour to chocolate bar cookies. Or stir through vanilla ice cream with choc chips for an instant posh ice cream.